Fall Reopening Plan (2020-21)

The School in Rose Valley (SRV) opened on September 2 for the 2020-21 school year. The policies, procedures, and campus structure that are reflected in the plan below, will make possible the delivery of our outstanding progressive program while simultaneously providing for the health and safety of our students, faculty and staff, and families during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Three teams—Health and Safety, Program, and Community—contributed to this document. Those teams include various stakeholders in the SRV community who jointly consider information provided to us from the Centers for Disease Control, state and local departments of health and education, the CHOP Policy Lab, and national medical associations to make the decisions necessary for the health and safety of our community during this time. This plan reflects our current knowledge and will be updated as new information is made available.

 

Planning Teams

Health & Safety

Nava Hall, KJ Weist, Dan Tracey, Paula Grey, Byron Sherwood, and Joffee Emergency Services

Program

Diane Luckman, Sunday Small, and Silvio Navarro

Community

Rory Mannion, Stewart Calloway, Carrie Miluski, Nora Quinn, and Sophia Toussaint-Williams

 

Timeline of Key Events

March 2020

  • The School transitions to SRV@Home.

April 2020

  • The first Measuring Success survey is conducted and the resulting

upgraded Distance Learning Plan is shared with families.

May 2020

  • MayFair@Home

June 2020

  • The SRV Virtual Summer Camp begins.
  • Virtual Bead Ceremony
  • OG Leaving Ceremony
  • Preliminary reopening plan is shared with families
  • The Second Measuring Success survey is conducted.

July 2020

  • The updated reopening plan is shared with families

 

End of School Year 2019-20 Survey 
Key Data Points, Insights, and Planned Actions – Click here


Program Plan

Pods

  • In order to promote the safety and well-being of our community, students will be grouped in “pods” of approximately 10 children.
  • A lead teacher, one specials teacher, and an assistant, where applicable, will be part of each pod, and teachers and students will remain with their pod at all times.
  • Pods will primarily be grouped by age with other considerations secondary.

Schedule

  • Starting on September 2nd, we anticipate being on campus for the whole school day. Each classroom will be prepared to provide both synchronous and asynchronous instruction for students learning from home.
  • Specials teachers will be placed in pods for a determined number of weeks before rotating to a new classroom.
  • Curriculum will be offered asynchronously for other classrooms.

Blended Learning 

  • A blended digital curriculum will be integrated into each classroom to ensure students’ familiarity with learning technology, should we have to transition to distance learning.
  • All students will be provided with an Apple iPad and teachers will use Apple Macbooks to deliver blended learning.
  • Preschool through Primary Circle will use Seesaw as their online learning platform. Middle Circle through Oldest Group will use Google Classroom.
  • All synchronous learning will happen via Zoom.

Food Program

  • Snack and lunch will be handled and served in the classroom by one teacher in each class. All serving utensils, plates and silverware will be thoroughly sanitized after each meal.
  • Snacks and lunch will continue to be provided by the school.
  • Classroom jobs will remain a key part of social learning but they will be adapted to meet health and safety protocols. 
  • All food will be handled by one teacher in each classroom.
  • All surfaces will be sanitized before and after meals to mitigate the spread of germs.
  • Students will be seated in accordance to social-distancing guidelines.

Campus 

  • Students will spend as much time outdoors as possible. In addition to constructing outdoor classrooms to facilitate learning around campus, the use of these spaces, playgrounds and equipment, will be staggered with cleanings between use.
  • Students will remain in their pods while on campus and there will be no sharing of indoor spaces between pods.
  • Visitors to campus will be limited and regulated. Visitors will be restricted from entering student learning spaces.
  • Upgrades to campus will include technology infrastructure, health and safety precautions and outdoor learning spaces.
  • School traditions and seasonal events are being reimagined so we can continue to offer the safest environment for our community.

Sample Daily Hybrid Schedules 

Play Zone & Outdoor Classroom Maps


Health & Safety Plan
 


Health & Safety Plan – Click Here 


Distance Learning Plan (2020-21)

SRV is prepared to pivot to our distance learning program, SRV@Home, at any point during the school year, should it be required or desired. A blended digital curriculum is integrated into each classroom to ensure that students are familiar with learning technology, should we have to transition. There are two reasons why a student might be at home and need to learn through SRV@Home.

1) The family has chosen for their child to learn through SRV@Home.

2) The student is required by the Health Coordinator to quarantine for a specific amount of time.

The family has chosen to learn through SRV@Home. If families choose for their child to learn virtually through SRV@Home this must go through the Head of School and the expectation for the duration will be the same as the quarantine period of two weeks. The two weeks duration maintains consistency with any potential quarantine and allows teachers to develop consistent routines with students whose families have selected this option. If a family chooses this option, they should notify the Head of School and he will set them up in SRV@Home and coordinate with the child’s teacher.

The student is required by the Health Coordinator to quarantine for a specific amount of time. Any student who is sent home by the Health Coordinator and is physically able to learn has the ability to learn through the SRV@Home distance learning platform as soon as possible. The Health Coordinator will alert the Head of School and he will reach out to the family to ensure that they are prepared and to coordinate the collection of any materials that they might need and the student’s iPad if she or he doesn’t have it. So that teachers can prepare communications and materials, we asked that families allow us the school day to coordinate this process.

Methods of Communication 

CHANNEL 

AUDIENCE 

DESCRIPTION 

Email

Students and parents

School leadership will use My Student’s Progress (MSP) for communicating regular updates about the impact of COVID-19 and strategic planning and Constant Contact to relay information about community events and happenings.

Zoom

Students, parents and staff

Zoom is our primary platform for synchronous classroom meetups.

SeeSaw

Students

SeeSaw is the hub for all Preschool and Lower Elementary classroom activities, lessons, and schedules.

Google Classroom

Students

Google Classroom is the hub for all Upper Elementary classroom activities, lessons, and schedules.

Website

Community and Public

The website will be used as a repository for school communications, information about the impact of COVID-19 and as an interface for prospective families.

Google Calendar

Students, parents and staff

Each SeeSaw and Google Classroom in SRV@Home has its own dedicated Google Calendar. The schedule for Zoom meetings will be posted in each classroom’s respective calendar.  

 

General Guidelines for Families 

Establish Routines and Expectations. Research shows that children are more likely to thrive with predictable, consistent routines at home that provide, among other things, a sense of security, and help their social and emotional well-being. This source of stability will be even more critical during what may be a prolonged period without the structure of a normal school day. SRV Encourages parents to set regular hours for their children’s work. Decide what aspects of the daily routine will stay the same, and use your kid’s regular schedule as a starting point. Wake-up time shouldn’t slide too late, despite what your daughter or son might prefer. Posting a paper schedule that you make with your child near his or her workspace may be helpful. Serve lunch at the same time as it would be at school, and encourage your child to use that break to catch up with a friend using FaceTime to provide more personal social engagement with peers. Likewise, keep other activities on schedule, if possible, even if it takes some creative thinking.  

Define the physical space for your child’s work. We encourage families to establish a consistent space where their child can learn. Ideally, this would be in a common area that can be quiet for long portions of the day and that has a strong wireless signal. It should be a place where parents can monitor their child’s learning. 

Monitor communications from your child’s teacher and the School and partner to create an engaging learning experience. The frequency, audience, and detail of communications will be determined by your child’s age, maturity, and degree of independence. SRV encourages parents to collaborate with teachers while also being mindful of their time and understanding that COVID-19 has impacted their situation at home and their family’s. Share the ways in which your child is engaging with SRV@Home including the devices that she or he is using and if he or she is feeling stressed, overwhelmed, or disengaged. You can also seek help and advice from the School’s Learning Support Team and leadership. We are here to support you and understand the challenges of distance learning. As a community, we all need to convey empathy, understanding, patience, calmness, and clarity in all of our communications. 

Begin and end each day with a check-in and allow children opportunities to process. SRV families are encouraged to begin and finish each day with a check in. Ask your child what he or she is interested in learning and for older students, what their goals are. What is their schedule? What help do they need? What resources do they require? This allows them to process the instructions that they have received from their teachers, organize themselves, and set priorities. In addition, circle back with them often to help them to process. You do not need to have an answer for questions or feel that you need to direct their learning all of the time. Letting them talk aloud about their ideas, challenges, and questions are a way for them to process information. If you allow them to do this without giving them answers and simply ask them questions, such as, What have you thought of already? Are there other solutions? And Why do you think that? or Tell me more?, you may find that they already knew the answer but simply needed to process their thoughts. 

Allow for choice and intrinsic motivation. Children learn from everything they do. They are naturally curious; they want to explore and discover. If their explorations bring pleasure or success, they will want to learn more. Intrinsic motivation refers to behavior that is driven by internal rewards. In other words, the motivation to engage in a behavior arises from within the individual because it is intrinsically rewarding. A heavy emphasis on right answers, grades and teacher praise, can squelch children’s internal drive and replace it with an emphasis on external praise and reward. For children in environments that “reward” their good work with teacher praise or public acclaim, with bonuses and gold stars, that natural curiosity can be replaced with a focus on the external reward. Over time, the child becomes increasingly dependent on the rewards to motivate their work, and requires increasingly ambitious rewards as they acclimate to each new level of praise. Extrinsic motivation takes the momentum for learning outside of the child.  

Set aside one time a day for a creative, child-led project that helps your daughter or son explore an interest in a hands-on way. Ask your child to research a particular art period and make his own version of what he’s seen using whatever supplies you have on hand. Turn the kitchen into a lab and have your kid explore the science behind cooking. Make history personal by asking her to interview family members and investigate the details of her family story. The key is not to worry about your child mirroring the lessons of school. Instead, aim to feed interest in and general knowledge about whatever topics he or she is studying. When school resumes, the most important thing will be that children continue to engage with the concepts. And, hopefully, you’ve helped foster a love of learning along the way. 

Get outdoors. How parents make the outdoors part of the school day will also be crucial. While some may be under self-quarantine, many of us will be able to take advantage of an early spring. Every day should include outdoor time, to burn off your kid’s extra energy and as an extension of whatever educational lesson is suitable for your yard or a nearby park. This can translate into an at-home version of recess — namely walking the dog, going for a bike ride or shooting hoops. But it can also be a way to bring the school day outdoors. For example, when you switch up where your child studies, designate a “period” for an outside lesson. Whether you live in a town or the suburbs, there are countless opportunities to use your surroundings for science experiments, history lessons or to otherwise explore the  subject of the hour. A simple online search — your children can do this themselves — can help narrow down the options and help your kid feel even more invested in that day’s outdoor lesson. 

Be mindful of your child’s stress or worry. It’s very important for parents to help manage the worry, anxiety, and range of emotions that children will experience because of the coronavirus. You can tune into this by asking how they are feeling about the coronavirus. While you want to discuss these events with your child, try your best not to transfer your own stress or worry to him or her. They will be having these strong feelings whether they express it or not and having a health conversation with you will help them to remember that they are cared for and will help them to better understand the world around them and process their feelings. 

Monitor how much time your child is spending online. SRV does not want its students staring at screens seven to eight hours a day. It will take time to find the right balance of on and off screen time so partnership and communication between you, the teachers, and the school will be key. We will check in with you to find out what you are experiencing at home and will make adjustments along the way. 

Leverage Community. Many of these ideas may not just seem overwhelming but also impossible for working parents. Even if you have the good fortune of working from home for an extended period of time while school is closed, how can you manage this on top of everything else? And if you can’t work remotely, what then? Reach out to other parents in your child’s class or a teacher, if possible, to divide and conquer. Perhaps one person can find options for good online math lessons and another can send around recipes for a kitchen-based science experiment that everyone can do with basic pantry ingredients. Also consider how your children and their friends can help one another or their younger siblings. With direct conversations and some coaching, this is a good chance for children to step into new responsibilities at home and take ownership of their own learning. Give them a few ideas and goals, with daily or weekly deadlines, and motivate them to take initiative.

Glossary of Terms (expandable accordion)

TERM

DEFINITION

Asynchronous Classes

Students working at their own pace, not all at the same time

Synchronous Classes

Students and teachers working together at the same time

 

Turned In

Depending on the assignment, you can turn in a personal doc that your teacher assigned to you, create your own Google Doc, or add files to the assignment. If you need to edit work you turned in, you can un-submit the assignment. But any assignment turned in or marked done after the due date is 

recorded as late.

Assigned

An activity or assignment that has been added to the Classwork section of SeeSaw or Google Classroom but has not yet been 

turned in.

Office Hours

A time when teachers are available to answer any questions 

and for help with assignments.

Post

Information or a question you add to the class stream. For example: When do we visit the museum?

Comment

A response to a post or another comment. For example: We go next Friday.

 

Distance Learning Structure

SRV@Home Structure for Preschool

  • Assignments and activities will be uploaded to the Classwork section of your child’s SeeSaw by 8:00 AM each weekday. These will automatically appear in the Stream section of the classroom. 
  • Teachers will respond to parent questions in a timely manner. For any program questions, parents can email the teacher directly or use messaging in Classroom.  
  • Teachers will offer synchronous Zoom meetings to all students for 30 minutes in whole-group, small-group, and individual formats on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. On Friday, teachers will engage in professional development but asynchronous activities and Zooms sessions with non-teaching staff will be made available to students. 
  • Synchronous learning schedules and Zoom links will be posted in each classroom’s respective Google Calendar, which can be accessed in the Classwork section of Seesaw or Google Classroom.  
  • Teachers will be ready to have individual meetings with families by appointment on a schedule convenient to both teacher and family.

SRV@Home Structure for Lower Elementary 

  • Assignments and activities will be uploaded to the Classwork section of your child’s SeeSaw by 8:00 AM each weekday. These will automatically appear in the Stream section of the classroom. 
  • Teachers will respond to student questions in a timely manner by responding to comments in SeeSaw, via email or phone. 
  • Teachers will offer synchronous learning to all students, via Zoom meetings: Kindergarten for 30 minutes and Primary Circle for one hour, in both whole class and small group formats, on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. On Friday, teachers will engage in professional development but asynchronous activities and Zooms sessions with non-teaching staff will be made available to students. 
  • Synchronous learning schedules and Zoom links will be posted in each classroom’s respective Google Calendar, which can be accessed in the Classwork section of SeeSaw. 

SRV@Home Structure for Upper Elementary (expandable accordion)

  • Assignments and activities will be posted in the Classwork section of your child’s Google Classroom by 8:00 AM each weekday. These will automatically appear in the Stream section of the classroom. 
  • Teachers will provide verbal and/or written feedback on assignments as needed. 
  • Teachers will offer synchronous learning, via Zoom meetings to all students: Middle Circle for 1.5 hours and Oldest Group for two hours each day, in both whole class and small group formats, on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. On Friday, teachers will engage in professional development but asynchronous activities and Zooms sessions with non-teaching staff will be made available to students. 
  • Synchronous learning schedules and Zoom links will be posted in each classroom’s respective Google Calendar, which can be accessed in the Classwork section of Google Classroom.  
  • Teachers will offer live office hours two times per week for 30 minutes. 
  • Teachers will be ready to have individual meetings with students by appointment on a schedule convenient to both teacher and family.

SRV@Home Structure for Specials

  • Assignments and activities will be posted in the Classwork section of your child’s Google Classroom by 8:00 AM each weekday. These will automatically appear in the Stream section of the classroom. 
  • Teachers will respond to student questions in a timely manner by responding to comments in Google Classroom, via email or phone. 
  • Special Teachers will offer synchronous Zoom meetings to all students for 30 minutes in both whole class and small group formats, on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. On Friday, teachers will engage in professional development but asynchronous activities and Zooms sessions with non-teaching staff will be made available to students. 
  • Teachers will be ready to have individual meetings with students by appointment on a schedule convenient to both teacher and family.

General Guidelines for Students 

Establish Routines. You’ll have a lot of freedom and flexibility to set your own schedule but with that freedom comes responsibility. It can be helpful to set a schedule. Set aside the time each day to tackle your daily learning goals. 

Create physical and digital workspaces. Find a quiet place where you won’t be distracted and refrain from finding distractions on your computer or iPad. Your physical workspace is as important and your digital workspace. It can be helpful to sit next to someone who is working in a focused way as well. 

Monitor communications from your teachers and plan your day. Start your day by reviewing your schedule with a parent.MC and OG students should check their Google Classroom themselves and Preschool, K, and PC should ask a parent for help. Talk through your day with a parent each morning and reflect on your day with a parent at the end of each day. 

Exercise! Movement makes us more productive. Studies show that exercise not only makes you healthier, it can make you happier and productive. Put time aside each day to move around. 

Use your computer or tablet as a connection point to your teacher and classroom. It’s easy to get distracted, particularly on a computer or tablet. During this time, your device is your connection to your teacher and your classroom. Limit your screen time to only part of your school day and and as a tool to make you better learners, not as a tool for distraction or entertainment during school. 

Be kind and helpful. Be social online but always remember to be kind, respectful, and responsible. Remember that you not only have a responsibility for your own learning but to contribute to the classroom in a way that helps everyone to learn. Don’t do things that would distract others or make it hard for the teacher to teach. 

Participate and contribute. Join in the conversation in a positive way and share what you know with the group. Remember that you will get out of distance learning what you put into it. 

Your teacher wants to know what interests you and what you need. Your knowledge and perspectives are awesome and can be beneficial to everyone in virtual meetings. 

Establish times for quiet and reflection. Everyone needs down times to reflect and relax. Taking even a few minutes to sit quietly can boost immunity, reduce stress, aid memory and concentration, and contribute to overall health. Meditating, taking a walk, or keeping a journal, are some ways to take time for yourself and reflect on your day and your feelings.

Assessment and Reporting 

 Assessment and Reporting for the Preschool

  • Teachers will conduct year-end conferences with parents via Zoom. 
  • Teachers will send a closing letter to each family. 

Assessment and Reporting for the Elementary School Lower Elementary (Kindergarten, Primary Circle) 

  • Teachers will work with students to engage in a self-reflection which will then be shared with families during conferences.  
  • Teachers will conduct year-end conferences with parents via Zoom. 
  • Teachers will send a closing letter to each family. 

Upper Elementary (Middle Circle, Oldest Group) 

  • Teachers will work with students to write self-reflections which will then be shared with families during conferences.  
  • Teachers will conduct year-end conferences with parents via Zoom. 
  • Teachers will send a closing letter to each family.  

Assessment and Reporting for Specials 

  • Specials teachers will be available for conferences with parents. Schedules will be coordinated by the School office.

Netiquette for Online Courses 

Videoconferencing 

  • You should dress the same as you would for attending classes while participating in video conferences. 
  • Your video camera should be turned on during a video conference. 
  • Your microphone should be muted during a video conference unless you have been recognized to speak. 
  • When speaking, and using the chat feature during a video conference, you should adhere to the same courtesies that you would use when interacting in the classroom. 
  • Physically raise your hand, or use the raise hand feature, when you want to speak during the conference and wait to be acknowledged before speaking. 
  • Do not under any circumstances share the links for your Zoom or Google Meet conferences, especially on social media, where they can be viewed by others. 

  Email 

  • Make sure identification is clear in all communications. Begin with a salutation (“Hi Mrs.Hansen!”) and end with your signature (John Smith). 
  • Review what you wrote and try to interpret it objectively. When we speak face to face and are misunderstood, we have an on-the-spot opportunity to rephrase our words. In writing, we must strive twice as hard to be understood, as we do not have the benefit of modifying or elaborating in real-time. 
  • All caps (“I’M SHOUTING”) and exclamation points (“Give me a break!!!”) can be 
  • misinterpreted as intense anger or humor without the appropriate context.

SRV is thrilled to welcome students back for the 2020-21 school year, with both in-person and virtual options! Click here to review our reopening plan and learn more about our policies and procedures that keep our students safe, engaged, and thriving.